The art of winter driving: 28 tips to give you cold comfort

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Smoothness is everything: Use light pressure on the accelerator, brakes and steering wheel. Make your hands move slowly. Abrupt movements will break traction and start a skid.

Keep your eyes focused far ahead: You are a human stability control system, and vision is key to its proper operation. Looking far down the road reduces head movement and moderates your steering inputs, reducing the chance of a slide.

Kick the snow off your boots before you get in the car: If you don't, it will melt inside the car, turn into water vapour, and fog the windows.

Remove the snow from every surface of your car, not just the windows: Snow on the hood and front end can blow up onto the windshield as you accelerate. Snow on the roof can fall down over the back window – or slide forward under braking, covering the windshield like a blindfold.

Keep your lights on all the time: That way, other vehicles can see you better.

Newer cars stop and handle better on ice than old ones do: Late-model cars have multi-channel ABS systems that can stop you much shorter than old-school systems. Late-model cars also have electronic stability control systems that can apply corrective braking to individual wheels if you start to slide sideways.

Switch on the air conditioning: It removes moisture from the cabin air, improving defroster performance.

Stay behind a snowplow or salt truck: It's safer than passing it.

Turn off cruise control: You need to respond instantly if you start losing traction.

Change lanes slowly and smoothly: The ridge of snow that builds up between lanes will grab your wheels, so you need to minimize your steering angle.

If you skid: Keep your eyes aimed where you want to go, and steer toward that point.

Be extra careful when the thermometer is yo-yoing: If the temperature climbs above the freezing point and falls again, snow can melt, then turn into glare ice.

Do some test sliding: Go to an empty parking lot and try sliding your car so you'll know what it feels like. This will help create a conditioned response and allow you to react properly when you slide unexpectedly.

Keep two sets of wheels: One with summer tires, the other with dedicated winter tires. Switch them slightly ahead of the coming season.

Beware the all-season tire: They're okay in summer, but they don't come close to winter tires on snow and ice. The difference in acceleration, cornering and stopping power can range from five to 20 per cent, depending on your car, technique conditions. That improvement may spell the difference between crashing and getting home.

The most important feature of winter tires isn't their more aggressive tread: What really matters most is their special rubber compound, which keeps them soft at lower temperatures, increasing traction.

Use winter tires on all four wheels: Many drivers still believe that you only need winter tires on the driven wheels. Wrong. Although the driven wheels are key to acceleration, braking and cornering call for traction at all four corners. Mixing winter and non-winter tires creates a dangerous traction imbalance that can throw you out of control.

Carry a cell phone: Keep it charged. Don't use it while you're driving.

Don't wear clunky winter boots: You need to feel the pedals.

Don't spin your wheels if you get stuck: This digs you in deeper. Rock the car gently back and forth by shifting into forward and reverse, building momentum so you can escape.

Go slow: Snow and ice increase stopping distance and reduce cornering power. The posted limit may be too fast for winter conditions.

Multiply your following distance: In summer, most drivers allow a two- to three-second gap behind traffic. This is calculated by counting how long it takes you to reach an object after the car in front passes it. In slippery conditions, you should triple or quadruple this.

Four-wheel drive won't help you stop faster: Unfortunately, it does let you accelerate faster (this isn't always a good thing).

Beware of sun-shadowed areas: Even if the road is clear, shadowed areas may icy, since they're sheltered from the sun. Ice isn't as slippery as you think – if you have good car-control skills and proper winter tires, an icy surface can offer more traction than you'd expect. But it takes experience to use it properly.

Bridges are dangerous: They cool faster than the road, so they're more slippery in cold weather.

When you stop for fuel: Clean your windows and rearview mirrors, plus your head and taillights.

Keep your windshield washer fluid topped up: You may need it.

Take a winter driving course: You'd be amazed at how much you can learn from professionals.

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/glo...tips-to-give-you-cold-comfort/article7036912/
 

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https://driving.ca/auto-news/news/the-10-dumbest-things-drivers-do-in-winter

The 10 dumbest things drivers do in winter
For the sake of everyone's sanity, avoid making these mistakes on the road this winter
by Lorraine Sommerfeld | November 13, 2017

calweather.jpg

This winter, don't end up like this guy. Darren Makowichuk

We’re halfway through November, and winter is coming. Chances are you’ll find yourself behind the wheel at some point between now and April. So, for the sake of your sanity (and everyone else’s), Lorraine Sommerfeld is here to explain 10 driving mistakes you should avoid making at all costs this winter.

Why on the road at all? If a bad storm is in the forecast or has already landed, you don’t need to go to the mall, the beer store or your friend’s place anyway. Stay home. If you can work from home, do that. If you can reschedule appointments, do that. Driving in bad conditions should only be a necessary evil, not a challenge you accept.

No winter tires? Sigh. If you drive in Canada, with very few exceptions, you need winter tires. When you purchase a new car, roll the cost of a second set of tires into the price of the car. Even entry-level winters are better than three-season tires; if you look for used tires, pay close attention to the age as well as the wear. If you have determined you are too good a driver to need winters, consider all the idiots around you and that one time you will be forced to brake suddenly because they can’t. You don’t get to make all the calls on our roads.

Driving like an idiot because you have winter tires on. You’re not all of a sudden SuperCar. You’re not Mad Max, even if you have a spiffy SUV with expensive winter boots. You still brake the same, so while you’re flying down the highway leaving the peasants behind, know if you’re over your head, there is a ditch ahead with your name on it.

Not clearing your snow. You hop in your car, flip the wipers and can see perfectly, right? No. That muffin top you left on top of your car is a disaster for everyone in your wake. Give yourself extra time – sometimes a lot – to clear your entire car. Use an extended brush, get a step stool if you have to. Clear every headlight and taillight. Clear the whole roof. A great brush makes a great Christmas gift.

Not switching on your lights. The daytime running lights argument continues to rage, but even with government legislation set to kick in September 2020, that will leave years of cars driving around with dark rear ends. Dangerous all year round, it’s particularly lethal in our long dark winters. Just switch on your full lighting system, every time you drive. Every time. See where you’re going, and let other drivers see you.

If you rely on the automatic setting, make sure it’s always set and anyone who drives your car is checking as well. I watched a car on the highway cut in front of another in the passing lane the other day, and darken his own rear end to signal to the car behind that only his DRLs were on. Nope. Didn’t get it. People running on the DRLs aren’t aware, and we have no signal. Though perhaps if those around you are giving you loony tune hand signs and flashing their lights, consider something is up.

Driving in big fat boots. This is often overlooked, because what might be safest for walking in our winters can be the most deadly for driving. Especially in smaller cars and more streamlined CUVs, the pedals are closer together. Ideally, proper driving shoes are thin soled and flexible; the opposite of Sasquatch winter boots. It’s ridiculously easy to catch a pedal with the side of a wide boot, just like in summer it’s too easy to have a flip flop catch. Cars never go out of control, regardless of what some headlines would have you believe. Drivers lose control. Period.

Leaving your car on the street for the plow. Just, no.

No roadside assistance. Most new cars have a program, but check when it expires. It’s not usually the length of your loan, or even the warranty. Make arrangements and call CAA before you need them. It’s also another awesome Christmas gift for those you love.

Not updating your wiper blades and windshield washer fluid. Next to tires, your ability to see is probably the most important part of your drive. Don’t compromise safety for something often overlooked; they should be changed out annually, at least. Don’t forget your rear blade, if you have one. And with temperatures that go up and down like a toilet seat at a mixed party, keep your washer fluid topped up. That magnesium and calcium chloride that’s used to keep you safe on the roads is also super sticky and can make a mess of your windshield.

Driving too fast. This should be the whole list, actually. Every news cast covering snarls and collisions and that first big bang up – you know the one – will feature cops saying one thing over and over: Folks were driving too fast for conditions. There is no such thing as an accident, even in a huge weather event. Driver error is at fault. Slow down. Then slow down some more, or go back to number one on the list.
 
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https://driving.ca/auto-news/news/the-10-dumbest-things-drivers-do-in-winter

The 10 dumbest things drivers do in winter
For the sake of everyone's sanity, avoid making these mistakes on the road this winter
by Lorraine Sommerfeld | November 13, 2017

calweather.jpg

This winter, don't end up like this guy. Darren Makowichuk

We’re halfway through November, and winter is coming. Chances are you’ll find yourself behind the wheel at some point between now and April. So, for the sake of your sanity (and everyone else’s), Lorraine Sommerfeld is here to explain 10 driving mistakes you should avoid making at all costs this winter.

Why on the road at all? If a bad storm is in the forecast or has already landed, you don’t need to go to the mall, the beer store or your friend’s place anyway. Stay home. If you can work from home, do that. If you can reschedule appointments, do that. Driving in bad conditions should only be a necessary evil, not a challenge you accept.

No winter tires? Sigh. If you drive in Canada, with very few exceptions, you need winter tires. When you purchase a new car, roll the cost of a second set of tires into the price of the car. Even entry-level winters are better than three-season tires; if you look for used tires, pay close attention to the age as well as the wear. If you have determined you are too good a driver to need winters, consider all the idiots around you and that one time you will be forced to brake suddenly because they can’t. You don’t get to make all the calls on our roads.

Driving like an idiot because you have winter tires on. You’re not all of a sudden SuperCar. You’re not Mad Max, even if you have a spiffy SUV with expensive winter boots. You still brake the same, so while you’re flying down the highway leaving the peasants behind, know if you’re over your head, there is a ditch ahead with your name on it.

Not clearing your snow. You hop in your car, flip the wipers and can see perfectly, right? No. That muffin top you left on top of your car is a disaster for everyone in your wake. Give yourself extra time – sometimes a lot – to clear your entire car. Use an extended brush, get a step stool if you have to. Clear every headlight and taillight. Clear the whole roof. A great brush makes a great Christmas gift.

Not switching on your lights. The daytime running lights argument continues to rage, but even with government legislation set to kick in September 2020, that will leave years of cars driving around with dark rear ends. Dangerous all year round, it’s particularly lethal in our long dark winters. Just switch on your full lighting system, every time you drive. Every time. See where you’re going, and let other drivers see you.

If you rely on the automatic setting, make sure it’s always set and anyone who drives your car is checking as well. I watched a car on the highway cut in front of another in the passing lane the other day, and darken his own rear end to signal to the car behind that only his DRLs were on. Nope. Didn’t get it. People running on the DRLs aren’t aware, and we have no signal. Though perhaps if those around you are giving you loony tune hand signs and flashing their lights, consider something is up.

Driving in big fat boots. This is often overlooked, because what might be safest for walking in our winters can be the most deadly for driving. Especially in smaller cars and more streamlined CUVs, the pedals are closer together. Ideally, proper driving shoes are thin soled and flexible; the opposite of Sasquatch winter boots. It’s ridiculously easy to catch a pedal with the side of a wide boot, just like in summer it’s too easy to have a flip flop catch. Cars never go out of control, regardless of what some headlines would have you believe. Drivers lose control. Period.

Leaving your car on the street for the plow. Just, no.

No roadside assistance. Most new cars have a program, but check when it expires. It’s not usually the length of your loan, or even the warranty. Make arrangements and call CAA before you need them. It’s also another awesome Christmas gift for those you love.

Not updating your wiper blades and windshield washer fluid. Next to tires, your ability to see is probably the most important part of your drive. Don’t compromise safety for something often overlooked; they should be changed out annually, at least. Don’t forget your rear blade, if you have one. And with temperatures that go up and down like a toilet seat at a mixed party, keep your washer fluid topped up. That magnesium and calcium chloride that’s used to keep you safe on the roads is also super sticky and can make a mess of your windshield.

Driving too fast. This should be the whole list, actually. Every news cast covering snarls and collisions and that first big bang up – you know the one – will feature cops saying one thing over and over: Folks were driving too fast for conditions. There is no such thing as an accident, even in a huge weather event. Driver error is at fault. Slow down. Then slow down some more, or go back to number one on the list.

多了记不住。能不能简化为3个?
 

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有不少tips 明显跟冬天无关。
 
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