Federalist publisher Ben Domenech says US lockdowns是“中国想要的”

lindamy

时代广场舞照跳
VIP
注册
2005-11-23
消息
19,408
荣誉分数
4,197
声望点数
373
Federalist publisher says US lockdowns are ‘what China wants’

Ben Domenech said he believes recurring lockdowns are 'what China wants' to devastate the US economy

Federalist publisher Ben Domenech on Friday said he believes recurring lockdowns are “what China wants” to devastate the U.S. economy and the media is “playing into China’s hands” with its coronavirus coverage.

Domenech told Fox News’ John Roberts on "America's Newsroom" that China is advocating for U.S. lockdowns to allow its economy to flourish while the U.S. economy continues to suffer.

Domenech, who is married to "The View" co-host Meghan McCain, said that over the last few months Twitter has deleted over 200,000 different accounts that it connected with China. He said that many other accounts still exist, and they post material in favor of U.S. lockdowns, along with material about Hong Kong and Taiwan, a “tell” of their affiliation with the Chinese government.

Domenech said China interfering to instill fear and prompt a second wave of lockdowns would be “far greater” than the threat Russia posed in 2016 election interference.

The publisher said that the media in its coronavirus coverage is unintentionally “playing into China’s hands” by advocating for lockdowns.

He noted a spike in coronavirus cases across the country but said a lot of places locked down “in the wrong timing,” and locked down “too soon.”

“This kind of wave of recurring lockdowns is the kind of thing that completely undermines the ability of small businesses to function and has long term effects in our economy that no amount of stimulus is going to be able to paper over,” Domenech continued.

Domenech echoed the sentiments of Federalist executive editor Joy Pullmann, who wrote that the Chinese Communist Party has “expertly manipulated American corporate media’s anti-American biases to undermine their biggest competitor for control of the world.”

“There is a hard limit to how much fake economic activity current and future taxpayers can float. We had already reached it before coronavirus hit. A bailout economy will crash irrevocably at some point,” Pullman continued. “No matter how much Congress thinks they can suspend the laws of nature, never-ending economic inflation through accelerating claims on future American earners’ incomes is utterly unsustainable.”

States such as Texas, Florida, Arizona and California have reinstituted partial coronavirus shutdowns after facing a spike in cases. Florida, South Carolina and Texas all reported their largest one-day spikes Thursday, and the U.S. overall saw 77,000 new cases. The country saw 969 people die of coronavirus Thursday, the highest tally since June 10.

 

ccc

难得糊涂
管理成员
VIP
注册
2003-04-13
消息
223,252
荣誉分数
34,436
声望点数
1,393
美国疫情防控还不够宽松?

那就完全恢复往常好了。
 

Jay Wang

薄皮大馅
VIP
注册
2008-05-09
消息
23,704
荣誉分数
4,617
声望点数
373
这逻辑强大: ‘lockdown米国人穷了,土鳖爽;不lockdown米国人死了,土鳖爽'

土鳖打着滚儿的爽
 

livingeverywhere

你删贴,就说明你特别害怕我说的,如CFC红徽记就是连台湾都是红色。观察我的消息数,每次减少就是被删了
注册
2008-08-02
消息
10,747
荣誉分数
1,156
声望点数
373
Ben Domenech (born January 1, 1982) is an American conservative writer, blogger, and television commentator. He is the co-founder and the publisher of The Federalist, host of The Federalist Radio Hour, and writes The Transom, a daily subscription newsletter for political insiders.
Born: January 1, 1982, Jackson, South Carolina
Profession: Writer, Commentator


一家之盐
 

Seraph72

高级会员
注册
2013-09-24
消息
1,164
荣誉分数
424
声望点数
93
这逻辑,这心态,美国政客真的是疯了,智商堪忧啊
 

livingeverywhere

你删贴,就说明你特别害怕我说的,如CFC红徽记就是连台湾都是红色。观察我的消息数,每次减少就是被删了
注册
2008-08-02
消息
10,747
荣誉分数
1,156
声望点数
373
The Federalist is an American conservative online magazine and podcast that covers politics, policy, culture, and religion, and publishes a newsletter.[2][3][4][5] The site was co-founded by Ben Domenech and Sean Davis and launched in September 2013.[5]

Contents
History and controversy[edit]
The Federalist was co-founded by Luke Sherman, Ben Domenech and Sean Davis; senior editors include David Harsanyi and Mollie Hemingway.[6][7] Domenech wrote that The Federalist was inspired by the mission and worldview of the original Time magazine's editor, Henry Luce, which he described as, "[leaning] to the political right, with a small-c conservatism equipped with a populist respect for the middle class reader outside of New York and Washington, and an abiding love for America at a time when snark and cynicism were not considered substitutes for smart analysis."[8]

Quoted in the Washington Post in 2018, Domenech described The Federalist as having no office and a staff that was "majority female, half millennial, and a quarter minority."[9] The website is owned by a private company and doesn't have to disclose its ownership or funding structure. According to BuzzFeed News, the website's funding has prompted "a considerable amount of speculation in the political media world, with the phrase 'Who funds the Federalist?' becoming a recurring meme, often tweeted at the site's management. The Federalist has winked at the controversy, selling at one point an 'I Fund the Federalist' T-shirt."[10]

Neil deGrasse Tyson[edit]
In late 2014, The Federalist published an article alleging that Neil deGrasse Tyson had used "misstated" quotes in his public presentations, including one attributed to George W. Bush.[11][12][13] Tyson later cited the Bush quote to a speech given after the Space Shuttle Columbia disaster, and apologized to Bush for misremembering the date and context.[14]

Roy Moore[edit]
In November 2017, The Federalist came under criticism from both conservatives and liberals for publishing an opinion piece by Tully Borland, Ouachita Baptist University philosopher, defending Roy Moore for dating teenagers while he was in his 30s, and arguing that such behavior was "not without some merit if one wants to raise a large family."[15] Noah Rothman of the conservative Commentary Magazine stated that the op-ed was "rationalizing away child molestation."[15] Molly Roberts of the Washington Post wrote that the op-ed was "uniquely awful."[16] Ben Domenech defended The Federalist for publishing Borland's op-ed saying the magazine "remains avowedly committed to offering alternative views. For those that have a problem with this, the question is simple: what are you afraid of?"[17]

"Black crime" tag[edit]
Until October 2017, The Federalist had a "black crime" tag, which aggregated articles related to criminal activity by black Americans.[18][19] Dan McLaughlin of National Review, a former Federalist contributor, said that the phrasing of the "black crime" tag was "unfortunate," that when he had written for The Federalist he had "never even noticed that there were tags at the bottom of my essays," and that The Federalist "had deleted the tag as soon as it attracted any notice—over a couple of years the tag appeared on only five or six posts."[20]

Andrew McCabe[edit]
In May 2018, The Federalist published an article which suggested that former FBI deputy director Andrew McCabe had leaked a story to the news channel CNN.[21] The article presented no evidence that this was the case, only that McCabe was aware that CNN would publish a story four days prior to its eventual publication.[21] According to Matt Ford in The New Republic, the more likely explanation was that CNN contacted the FBI Press Office, consistent with journalistic practices, for comment on a forthcoming story.[21] George W. Bush's former press secretary Ari Fleischer agreed that CNN was likely contacting the FBI for comment on a forthcoming story, and said that "Whoever told CNN about the briefing is the problem."[21] The Federalist story was widely disseminated, including a tweet from Donald Trump Jr.[21]

Coronavirus pandemic misinformation[edit]
During the COVID-19 pandemic, The Federalist published numerous pieces that contained false information or information that was contrary to the recommendations of public health experts and authorities.[22][23] The Federalist published articles denouncing social distancing, as well as articles claiming that fears over the pandemic had been overhyped by the Democratic Party and the media. The Federalist co-founder Sean Davis said that Democrats were intentionally trying to "destroy the economy" as a “last-ditch 2020 play”, and that "All they care about is power. And if they have to destroy your life and business to get power back, they will." The Federalist published articles calling on the government to quickly end social distancing directions, and to open businesses again.[23] Co-founder Domenech attacked a prominent analysis from Imperial College London which estimated the loss of life due to the pandemic; Domenech attacked the analysis for revising its figures downward, but the reason that the analysis did so was that the analysis incorporated the social distancing and shutdown strategies that had increasingly been implemented.[24]

It published a piece by someone identified as a physician in Oregon who recommended that people hold "chickenpox"-style parties for the coronavirus to build herd immunity, but the recommendations were contrary to those of public health experts, and the author in question did not have a medical license and had worked as a businessman for decades.[23][25][26] At the time, experts warned that the number of new infections should be kept down so as to not overburden the health care system.[27] The Federalist was subsequently temporarily suspended from Twitter for promoting fringe ideas that contradicted public health experts and were harmful to public health.[26] Reddit also removed links to The Federalist article on its platform.[28]

Labor law violation[edit]
In 2019, following staff of other American media companies unionizing, co-founder Domenech tweeted "first one of you tries to unionize I swear I'll send you back to the salt mine".[29] In 2020, an NLRB judge ruled that Domenech had threatened staff illegally and required the company to post notices in its offices and email employees to inform them about their legal rights.[30] Domenech argued unsuccessfully that the tweet was a joke.[30] The New Civil Liberties Alliance, a nonprofit dedicated to fighting what it says is an excessive administrative state, and which had been representing The Federalist pro bono, announced that the they would appeal. Reason and National Review published articles questioning the judge's decision.[31][32]
 

Hard Worker

知名会员
注册
2012-08-31
消息
2,839
荣誉分数
741
声望点数
173
坚决贯彻闯王的应死尽死的政策!
 
顶部