澳大利亚总理玩受害者牌,从川粉秒变登粉,呼吁美中和解!Scott Morrison calls on the United States and China to dial down hostilities

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Scott Morrison calls on the United States and China to dial down hostilities in speech at UK think tank Policy Exchange​


By foreign affairs reporter Stephen Dziedzic

Posted 3hhours ago


The Prime Minister has urged the United States and China to show more "latitude" to smaller nations, warning that partners and allies need "a bit more room to move" as strategic competition intensifies in the region.

Key points:​

  • Scott Morrison has called on US and China to dial down hostilities
  • He said recent actions in Australia were not part of a strategic campaign to contain China
  • Mr Morrison also said the victory of Democrat Joe Biden might ease tensions between China and the United States
Scott Morrison used a speech to the UK think tank Policy Exchange to call on both great powers to dial down hostilities, declaring Australia does not want to be forced into a "binary choice" between Washington and Beijing.
China's Government has recently ratcheted up criticism of Australia and hit several exports with trade sanctions, accusing the Federal Government of unfairly blocking Chinese investment and smearing China with false accusations of espionage and foreign interference.
But the Prime Minister said Australia's actions were not part of a strategic campaign to contain China and said the contest between the incumbent and rising powers "heavily clouded and distorted" Beijing's views.
"Our actions are wrongly seen and interpreted by some only through the lens of the strategic competition between China and the United States," Mr Morrison said.
"It's as if Australia does not have its own unique interests or views as an independent sovereign state. This is false and needlessly deteriorates relationships."
Mr Morrison urged both the US and China not to force nations into a corner.
"If we are to avoid a new era of polarisation, then in the decades ahead, there must be a more nuanced appreciation of individual states' interests in how they deal with the major powers," he said.
"Stark choices are in no-one's interests. Greater latitude will be required from the world's largest powers to accommodate the individual interests of their partners and allies.
"We all need a bit more room to move."
A composite of the Chinese and Australian flags on cracked ground.

Recently China's government has refused to phone take calls from a string of Australian Ministers, while releasing a list of complaints about Australia's behaviour.(ABC News: GFX/Jarrod Fankhauser)
The Prime Minister also said international institutions would play a vital role as "circuit breakers" which could function as a "bulwark against any further divide."
And he stressed that liberal democracies like Australia and the United Kingdom would have to "work together in common cause" to maintain peace, stability and open markets.
Mr Morrison's speech will be viewed as a repudiation of the Trump administration's sharpest polemics against China and an attempt to reset Australia's increasingly poisonous relationships with Beijing.
China's Government has refused to phone take calls from a string of Australian ministers, while releasing a long list of complaints about Australia's behaviour.
The Prime Minister said Australia was "very open" to a discussion about China's grievances.
But he chided Beijing for refusing to communicate, saying the "lines have to remain open … particularly when there are disagreements and misunderstandings."
"Unfortunately at the moment, in our own relationship, those lines of communications are not as we'd like them to be — but that is not of Australia's doing," he said.
And in his most frank comments to date on the US election, the Prime Minister also said the victory of Democrat president-elect Joe Biden might ease tensions between China and the United States.
"Perhaps the atmospherics of that relationship will change, following the most recent election," he said.

China's latest move straight from its punishment playbook​


The Morrison Government seems to be betting that all it needs to do is hold its nerve and hold the line when it comes to China's trade threats, writes Stephen Dziedzic.
Read more

Mr Morrison also played down the need for sweeping changes to the global economy in the wake of the coronavirus pandemics.
He also said the economic chaos was caused by the "economic meteor" of COVID-19 and failings in the global public health system rather than "structural weaknesses in our global economy".
"Nor is the pandemic recession the product of the failure of world capitalism or liberal, free market-based values," Mr Morrison said.
"It is actually these values that have provided the platform for the greatest period of peace and prosperity the world has ever known and has underpinned the very global institutions that has helped sustain it.
"It is these values that must now drive our economic recovery out of the pandemic recession. We don't need to 'reset' our economic agenda, we just need to get on with it."
Posted 3hhours ago
 

草头将军

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应该与中国的制裁有关系
如果不让他们长记性,很快他们就会重来
 

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This is a sign how the US is coming back to its "norm:"


5 things to know about Antony Blinken, Biden’s nominee for secretary of state​

Published: Nov. 23, 2020 at 1:56 p.m. ET
By

Nicole Lyn Pesce

The veteran diplomat is the stepson of a Holocaust survivor, worked for the Clinton and Biden administrations — and has two songs on Spotify

President-elect Joe Biden named veteran diplomat Antony Blinken as his nominee for secretary of state on Monday, as several news outlets had anticipated over the weekend.


Blinken, 58, is a longtime Biden adviser who first joined the State Department during the Clinton administration, when he also held roles as President Clinton’s chief foreign policy speechwriter and as a member of the National Security Council. He served as the national security adviser for then-vice president Biden during President Obama’s first term, before the commander-in-chief grabbed him to serve first as deputy national security adviser, and then as the deputy secretary of state.

But his rise in international politics actually “reads like a Jewish high-society screenplay,” a 2013 Washington Post profile has mused, which included growing up in Paris and playing guitar in a Washington, D.C. cover band. Here are 5 things you might not have known about the potential future secretary of state.

His stepfather is a Holocaust survivor. Antony “Tony” Blinken was born in New York City, but he moved to Paris when he was 9, after his parents divorced and his mother married Samuel Pisar. Pisar had survived the Majdanek and Dachau Nazi concentration camps as a boy, and escaped during a death march in 1945. Pisar was later granted American citizenship by an act of Congress, served in John F. Kennedy’s administration and became an A-list lawyer representing the likes of Jane Fonda and Elizabeth Taylor.




Blinken has credited his stepfather’s story and his time living in Paris for drawing him to diplomatic work. “I found myself enlisted at a very young age in playing junior diplomat, trying to explain the United States to my fellow students,” Blinken said during his 2014 confirmation hearing to become the deputy secretary of state.

But Blinken was tempted to choose art over politics. Blinken has a lifelong love for music, with friends revealing to the Washington Post he once sneaked out of his parents’ Parisian apartment to see a Rolling Stones concert as a young man. He played in a jazz band to raise money for his French school’s first yearbook, and he wrote for the Harvard Crimson and the weekly art magazine, What Is To Be Done. Once he began working in Washington, D.C., he would sometimes break out his guitar to jam blues songs and Beatles covers with fellow political pals like President Obama’s White House press secretary Jay Carney. (He also has a penchant for puns, with the Washington Post noting that he once began a White House meeting on Arctic policy by saying, “Before I go any further on this topic, I think we need to break the ice.”)

He has two songs on Spotify. He doesn’t just play Beatles covers; he has also written his own songs. He has two love songs posted on Spotify under the pun-tastic stage name “Ablinken” (say it out loud) called “Lip Service” and “Patience.” Check them out here.

He went on “Sesame Street” to encourage tolerance for refugees. While Blinken was the deputy secretary of state under President Obama, he met with “Sesame Street’s” furry blue monster Grover at the United Nations in New York City to talk about refugees, and how important it is to make families coming to America from other countries feel welcome. “These are people who’ve had to leave their homes because life in their countries was not safe for them. Grover can you imagine how difficult it would be to have to leave your home?” he asked at the time, adding, “even though they come from many different places, they’re just like you and me.”




His wife Evan Ryan is also a D.C. veteran. Ryan was Hillary Clinton’s scheduler while the latter was First Lady, and she has also worked as a Biden campaign staffer and as assistant secretary of state for educational and cultural affairs under President Obama. Blinken and Ryan married in a bi-denominational ceremony, as he is Jewish and she is Irish Catholic, and Blinken used his reception as another opportunity to talk about bringing different nations and religions together.
 

Anakin

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当小弟的又离中国那么近,老大让你二选一的时候没得选。
 
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