没有疫苗的情况下,印度快成功了。

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这可能是印度的检测能力极限了。
+271,566 new cases

死亡数字印度人自己都不信,没有木头了,自己带木头, Bring your own wood​

Non-stop cremations cast doubt on India’s counting of COVID dead​

Several major cities are reporting far larger numbers of cremations and burials under coronavirus protocols than official death tolls.

Relatives of COVID victims at Nigambodh Ghat crematorium in New Delhi. [File: Naveen Sharma/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images]

Relatives of COVID victims at Nigambodh Ghat crematorium in New Delhi. [File: Naveen Sharma/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images]
20 Apr 2021
Gas and firewood furnaces at a crematorium in the western Indian state of Gujarat have been running so long without a break during the COVID-19 pandemic that metal parts have begun to melt.
“We are working around the clock at 100 percent capacity to cremate bodies on time,” Kamlesh Sailor, the president of the trust that runs the crematorium in the diamond-polishing city of Surat, told the Reuters news agency.
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And with hospitals full and oxygen and medicines in short supply in an already creaky health system, several big cities are reporting far larger numbers of cremations and burials under coronavirus protocols than official COVID-19 death tolls, according to crematorium and cemetery workers, media and a review of government data.
India’s daily COVID-19 cases retreated from record levels on Tuesday but stayed above the 200,000 mark for a sixth-straight day, with cases increasing by 259,170 over the last 24 hours. Deaths rose by a record 1,761, health ministry data showed.
Officially, almost 180,000 Indians have died from coronavirus, 15,000 of them this month, although some believe the real number may be higher.
Indian social media and newspaper reports have been flooded with horrifying images of row upon row of burning pyres and crematoriums unable to cope.

‘Haven’t seen so many dead bodies’​

In the western state of Gujarat, many crematoriums in Surat, Rajkot, Jamnagar and Ahmedabad are operating around the clock with three to four times more bodies than normal.

000_97Y3MZ-1.jpg
This picture taken on April 13, 2021 shows burning funeral pyres of patients who died due to the coronavirus disease at a crematorium in Surat [AFP]In the diamond hub of Surat, Gujarat’s second-largest city, Sailor’s Kurukshetra crematorium and a second crematorium known as Umra have cremated more than 100 bodies a day under COVID-19 protocols over the last week, far in excess of the city’s official daily coronavirus death toll of approximately 25, according to interviews with workers.

Prashant Kabrawala, a trustee of Narayan Trust, which manages a third city crematorium called Ashwinikumar, declined to provide the number of bodies received under the virus’ protocols but said cremations there had tripled in recent weeks.
“I have been regularly going to the crematorium since 1987, and been involved in its day-to-day functioning since 2005, but I haven’t seen so many dead bodies coming for cremation in all these years,” even during an outbreak of the bubonic plague in 1994 and floods in 2006.
The iron frames inside another in Surat melted because there was no time to let the furnaces cool.
“Until last month we were cremating 20-odd bodies per day… But since the beginning of April we have been handling over 80 bodies every day,” said a local official at the Ramnath Ghela Crematorium in the city.

Last week, Sandesh, a Gujarati newspaper, counted 63 bodies leaving a single COVID-19-only hospital for burial in the state’s largest city, Ahmedabad, on a day where government data showed 20 coronavirus deaths.
The chimney of one electric furnace in Ahmedabad cracked and collapsed after being in constant use for up to 20 hours every day for the past two weeks.
With waiting times of up to eight hours, Rajkot has set up a dedicated 24/7 control room to manage the flow in the city’s four crematoriums.
Government spokesmen in Gujarat did not respond to requests for comment.
2021-04-09T121817Z_958021160_RC2CSM97LU8J_RTRMADP_3_HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS-INDIA.jpg
A relative leans against a glass window at the crematorium where a family member who died from the coronavirus disease is prepared for cremation, in New Delhi [Anushree Fadnavis/Reuters]

Bring your own wood​

In Lucknow, the capital of the populous northern state of Uttar Pradesh, data from the largest coronavirus-only crematorium, Baikunth Dham, shows double the number of bodies arriving on six different days in April than government data on COVID-19 deaths for the entire city.
At two crematoriums in Lucknow, relatives were given numbered tokens and made to wait for up to 12 hours. One started burning bodies in an adjacent park, an official told AFP news agency.
Rohit Singh, whose father died from COVID-19, said crematorium officials were charging around 7,000 rupees ($100) – almost 20 times the normal rate.
Some crematoriums in Lucknow ran out of wood and asked people to bring it themselves. Viral photos on social media showed electric rickshaws laden down with logs.
In Ghaziabad outside New Delhi, television pictures showed bodies wrapped in shrouds lined up on biers on the pavement with weeping relatives waiting for their slot.
The ultimate place for Hindus to be cremated is Varanasi, the ancient city where since time immemorial bodies have been burned on the banks of the river Ganges.
Belbhadra, who works at one of the famous ghats there, told AFP that they were cremating at least 200 suspected coronavirus victims per day.
The usual time to get to the ghat – a riverside embankment for cremations – from the main road via narrow lanes was usually three or four minutes, a resident said.
“Now it takes around 20 minutes. that’s how crowded the lanes are with people waiting to cremate the dead,” he said.
The figures from Lucknow do not take into account a second COVID-19-only crematorium in the city or burials in the Muslim community that makes up a quarter of the city’s population.
Crematorium head Azad, who goes by only one name, said the number of cremations under COVID-19 protocols had risen five-fold in recent weeks.
“We are working day and night,” he said. “The incinerators are running full time but still many people have to wait with the bodies for the last rites.”
A spokesman for the Uttar Pradesh government did not respond to a request for comment.

‘I will run out of space in 3-4 days’​

A summer storm is buffeting New Delhi as Mohammed Shamim wearily pauses to glance at yet another ambulance arriving with a coronavirus victim to bury, just minutes after the last.
The gravedigger’s grim workload, like those of others around India, has grown dramatically in the past few weeks in a brutal second wave that has caught authorities badly off guard.

2021-04-16T143711Z_1415644995_RC22XM98DWBD_RTRMADP_3_HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS-INDIA-DEATHS.jpg
People offer prayers before burying the victims who died due to the coronavirus disease, at a graveyard in New Delhi [Danish Siddiqui/Reuters]When AFP visited the Jadid Qabristan Ahle cemetery in the Indian capital – which is now in a week-long lockdown – on Friday, 11 bodies arrived within three hours.

By sunset, 20 bodies were in the ground. This compares to some days in December and January, when his earthmoving machine stayed idle and when many thought the pandemic was over.
“Now, it looks like the virus has legs,” Shamim, 38, a gravedigger like his father and grandfather, told AFP. “At this rate, I will run out of space in three or four days.”
Around the graveyard, white body bags or coffins made out of cheap wood are carried around by people in blue or yellow protective suits and lowered into graves.
Small groups of men, some in skullcaps, look solemnly at the ground as the imam, struggling to be heard as dust laced with rain swirls around, recites final prayers.
Sobbing women watch from their closed car windows next to the flashing lights of an ambulance as a yellow digger fills up the graves with the dry brown and grey soil.
“Two days ago someone came to me and said he needs to start preparing for his mother because doctors had given up on her,” Shamim said.
“It’s unreal. I never thought I’d see the day where I’d have a request for starting the funeral formalities of a living person.”
Elsewhere, India Today magazine reported two crematoriums in Bhopal, the capital of the central state of Madhya Pradesh, 187 bodies were cremated following COVID-19 protocols in four days this month, while the official coronavirus death toll stood at five.


‘Data denial’​

India is not the only country to have its coronavirus statistics questioned. But the testimony of workers and a growing body of academic literature suggest deaths in India are being under-reported compared with other countries.
Experts say reliable data is at the heart of any government response to the pandemic, without which planning for hospital vacancies, oxygen and medicine becomes difficult.
Bhramar Mukherjee, a professor of biostatistics and epidemiology at the University of Michigan, said many parts of India were in “data denial”.
“Everything is so muddy,” she said. “It feels like nobody understands the situation very clearly and that’s very irksome.”
Mukherjee’s research of India’s first wave concludes that there were 11 times more infections than were reported, in line with estimates from studies in other countries. There were also between two and five times as many deaths than were reported, far in excess of global averages.
The Lancet medical journal noted last year that four Indian states making up 65 percent of COVID-19 fatalities nationally each registered 100 percent of their coronavirus deaths.
But fewer than a quarter of deaths in India are medically certified, particularly in rural areas, meaning the true COVID-19 death rate in many of India’s 24 other states may never be known.
Government officials say the mismatch in death tallies may be caused by several factors, including over-caution.
A senior state health official said the increase in numbers of cremations had been due to bodies being cremated using COVID-19 protocols “even if there is 0.1 percent probability of the person being positive”.
“In many cases, patients come to hospital in an extremely critical condition and die before they are tested and there are instances where patients are brought dead to hospital, and we do not know if they are positive or not,” the official said
 

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第一波,HCQ辅助下,印度防疫效果绝对比美国好。
第二波,因为病毒变异,本地病毒变异,很可能产生抗药性(抗HCQ),所以第二波,感染和死亡攀升,合理。

应该是HCQ不够用了 :evil:
 
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billwanhua

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第一波,HCQ辅助下,印度防疫效果绝对比美国好。
第二波,因为病毒变异,本地病毒变异,很可能长生抗药性(抗HCQ),所以第二波,感染和死亡攀升,合理。
没有怀疑你的意思,第一波印度封锁是不是也有作用?当时很多报道拿着鞭子抽不听话的,还有大批人逃离城市的?现在印度完全放开,河里全部是人。
我没有反对hcq的意思,每个人有不同观点正常。但是个人觉得防疫第一要素就是封锁,其次才是疫苗,而且需要达到80%疫苗后才能解锁
 

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在印度封锁?你确定吗?能有什么效果?
没有怀疑你的意思,第一波印度封锁是不是也有作用?当时很多报道拿着鞭子抽不听话的,还有大批人逃离城市的?现在印度完全放开,河里全部是人。
我没有反对hcq的意思,美国人有不同观点正常。但是个人觉得防疫第一要素就是封锁,其次才是疫苗,而且需要达到80%疫苗后才能解锁
贫民窟怎么封锁?那个密度。。。
拿着鞭子,每家给一栋卡北中国湖别墅?或者西城区单元房一套?

当时,去年印度能都做到将病毒几乎归零,只可能有一种神奇的东西。那东西肯定不是中国方式的封锁!
 

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既然基本理清了印度前后的变化,就有一个和有趣的讨论了。

作为一个公共卫生极差,人口密度极高的国家

瘟疫来袭,发现一种可以抑制疫情的药物,但是这种药物,终究会被病的变异废掉。

1. 用,则在第一波保护国民, 但是第二波,可能会受到冲击。
2. 不用,则不会产生抗药病毒,第一波就受到冲击


那么你选择用还是不用?


实际情况,印度选择了用,结果表明。第一波确实保护了国民。但是病毒逃逸,不可避免,第二波,损失高企。

但是这个判断要考虑疫苗。疫苗需要时间,

假设印度不用HCQ,第一波将是极端惨烈的。肯定是咱们从没见过的惨烈。
幸好,印度没有被WHO和夫妻忽悠。没禁用HCQ。

那么第二波,HCQ失效的时候,没错印度会经历疫情考验,但是这个时候有疫苗了。只不过暂时数量不够。印度只要尽全力拿到更多的有效率疫苗,控制疫情就可以做到。

印度在现有条件下,基本上做出了最佳田忌赛马的选择。
 

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前后对比,HCQ简直就是印度第一波的救星啊。HCQ羟氯喹太牛了
 

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吃多了,耐药了。
 

longshan

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应该是HCQ不够用了 :evil:

‘The system has collapsed’: India’s descent into Covid hell​





Many falsely believed that the country had defeated Covid. Now hospitals are running out of oxygen and bodies are stacking up in morgues
by Hannah Ellis-Petersen in Delhi

Wed 21 Apr 2021 12.15 BST


4691

Looking out over a sea of jostling, maskless faces gathered at a political rally in West Bengal on Saturday, the Indian prime minister, Narendra Modi, proudly proclaimed that he had “never ever seen such huge crowds”. A mask was also noticeably absent from Modi’s face.
That same day, India registered a record-breaking 234,000 new coronavirus cases and 1,341 deaths – and the numbers have kept rising since.

The country has descended into a tragedy of unprecedented proportions. Almost 1.6 million cases have been registered in a week, bringing total cases to more than 15 million. In the space of just 12 days, the Covid positivity rate doubled to 17%, while in Delhi it hit 30%. Hospitals across the country have filled to capacity but this time it is predominately the young taking up the beds; in Delhi, 65% of cases are under 40 years old.
While the unprecedented spread of the virus has been partly blamed on a more contagious variant that has emerged in India, Modi’s government has also been accused of failures of political leadership from the top, with lax attitudes emulated by state and local leaders from all parties and even health officials across the country, which led many to falsely believe in recent months that India had defeated Covid.
A patient wearing an oxygen mask is wheeled inside a Covid-19 hospital for treatment in Ahmedabad.

A patient wearing an oxygen mask is wheeled inside a Covid-19 hospital for treatment in Ahmedabad. Photograph: Amit Dave/Reuters
“Leadership across the country did not adequately convey that this was an epidemic which had not gone away,” said K Srinath Reddy, president of the Public Health Foundation of India.
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“Victory was declared prematurely and that ebullient mood was communicated across the country, especially by politicians who wanted to get the economy going and wanted to get back to campaigning. And that gave the virus the chance to rise again.”
In West Bengal, where Modi’s government has refused to curtail the drawn-out state elections that his Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) is hoping to win, Modi and his home minister, Amit Shah, continued their public meetings and roadshows into this week even as queues of ambulances lined up outside hospitals across India. On Saturday, the same day as Modi’s rally, the state registered 7,713 new cases – the highest since the pandemic began. Three candidates running in the election have died from the virus. By Sunday, #ModiMadeDisaster began trending on Twitter.

Doctors on the frontline broke down, speaking of the deluge of dying Covid patients they had been unable to treat due to a lack of beds and inadequate state and central government preparation.
Advertisement

Dr Amit Thadhani, director of Niramaya hospital in Mumbai, which is only treating Covid patients, said he had given warnings about a virulent second wave back in February but they had gone ignored. He said now his hospital was “completely full and if a patient gets discharged, the bed is filled within minutes”. Ten days ago, the hospital ran out of oxygen, but alternative supplies were found just in time.
“There are people lined up outside the hospital trying to get in and every day we are getting calls every 30 seconds from someone trying to find a bed,” said Thadhani. “Most of these calls are for patients who are critically ill and do need hospital care but there just isn’t enough capacity and so there is a lot of mortality happening. Everyone has been stretched to their limit.”
Thadhani said this time round the virus was “much more aggressive and much more infectious” and was now predominately affecting young people. “Now it is people in their 20s and 30s who are coming in with very severe symptoms and there is a lot of mortality among young people,” he said.
Health workers and relatives carry the body of a man who died from coronavirus disease, at a crematorium in New Delhi.

Health workers and relatives carry the body of a man who died from coronavirus, at a crematorium in New Delhi. Photograph: Adnan Abidi/Reuters
Advertisement

The haunting blare of ambulance sirens continued to ring out across the capital almost non-stop. Inside Lok Nayak government hospital in Delhi, the largest Covid facility in the capital, overburdened facilities and a shortage of oxygen cylinders meant there was two to a bed, while outside patients waiting for beds gasped for air on stretchers and in ambulances, while sobbing relatives stood by their sides. Some sat with oxygen cylinders they had bought themselves out of desperation. Others died waiting in the hospital car park.

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In Mumbai, which was the first city to bear the brunt of the second wave, Dr Jalil Parkar of Lilavati hospital said that “the whole healthcare system has collapsed and doctors are exhausted”.
“There is a shortage of beds, shortage of oxygen, shortage of drugs, shortage of vaccines, shorting of testing,” said Parkar.
“Even though we opened another wing for Covid, we still don’t have nearly enough beds, so we have had to put some patients in the corridors and we have turned the basement into a triage area for Covid patients. We have people waiting in ambulances and wheelchairs outside the hospital and we have to sometimes give them oxygen out there. What else can we do?”

Even those in the upper echelons of power struggled to find beds for their loved ones. Vijay Singh Kumar, the national minister for transport and a BJP MP in the state of Uttar Pradesh, resorted to Twitter with the plea: “Please help us, my brother needs a bed for corona treatment. Now beds are not being arranged in Ghaziabad.”
Announcing a six-day lockdown to prevent the complete collapse of the healthcare system, Delhi’s chief minister, Arvind Kejriwal, did not mince his words. “The Covid situation in Delhi is grim,” he said on Monday. Over 99% of ICU beds in the capital were occupied that day and by Tuesday, several of Delhi’s top hospitals, all with hundreds of Covid patients, had declared oxygen emergencies, warning they had just hours of supplies left.

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States such a Gujarat and Uttar Pradesh stand accused of covering up the true death toll from coronavirus, with the numbers of bodies stacking up in hospital morgues far outnumbering official fatality figures. Among the worst-hit cities in Uttar Pradesh was Lucknow, where 22-year-old Deepti Mistri – a mother of one who had no pre-existing health conditions – was among the city’s dead, after falling ill with Covid on 14 April.
Her uncle Saroj Kumar Pandey, an ambulance driver who raised her from childhood, said he had desperately tried to find her a hospital bed when, two days later, her oxygen level began to drop dangerously to below 50% but could not find anywhere that had room.
A notice about the shortage of coronavirus vaccine supplies is seen at a vaccination centre, in Mumbai.

A notice about the shortage of coronavirus vaccine supplies is seen at a vaccination centre, in Mumbai. Photograph: Francis Mascarenhas/Reuters
“I realised Deepti needed oxygen immediately so I arranged for a cylinder for her myself,” he said. “I put her into the back of a relative’s car with the oxygen while I went around to a dozen private and government hospitals trying to find her a bed and a ventilator. But nowhere would take her.”
Eventually, late at night on 16 April Pandey found her a bed in a small six-bed private clinic in Lucknow. It was not a Covid hospital but they agreed to take her for a single night to give her oxygen while Pandey continued his search for a hospital bed. “We kept looking all night but nowhere had a bed or ventilator for her,” he said. “In the morning the clinic discharged her at 5am, so we had no choice but to bring her home. Deepti died a few hours later because she did not have oxygen and hospital care. She should be alive today.”
People carry a medical oxygen cylinder at a refilling station in Allahabad.

People carry a medical oxygen cylinder at a refilling station in Allahabad. Photograph: Sanjay Kanojia/AFP/Getty Images
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Twitter and Facebook have become a devastating catalogue of hundreds of thousands of urgent pleas for help finding hospital beds, oxygen, plasma and remdesivir, the drug experimentally used to help treat Covid patients, which remains in short supply in hospitals across the country.
The dead, meanwhile, have continued to overload crematoriums and graveyards in the states of Uttar Pradesh, Gujarat and Delhi faster than they could be burned, and families waited days to cremate their loved ones. On Sunday, Delhi’s largest cremation facility, Nigambodh Ghat, ran out of space, despite doubling its funeral pyres to more than 60.
State governments in Delhi and Mumbai have been scrambling to rebuild the temporary Covid facilities they had dismantled months earlier, while the central government announced an amping up of the vaccination programme which would mean anyone over the age of 18 will be eligible from 1 May, though a shortage of supplies remains an issue.
An edict from the government ruled that all oxygen meant for industrial use would now be diverted to hospitals to meet the unprecedented demand, and Indian railways said they were all set to operate special trains specially designed to carry liquid oxygen and oxygen cylinders, dubbed the “Oxygen Express”. Thousands of Covid beds have also been arranged in train carriages.
Still, many fear that it is too little, too late. “The seriousness of the situation should have been realised months ago but instead governments were in denial and gave out messages that the virus was not that dangerous any more,” said Thadhani. “I’m worried that we still have not seen the worst.”
Mohammad Sartaj Alam contributed reporting
 

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‘The system has collapsed’: India’s descent into Covid hell​





Many falsely believed that the country had defeated Covid. Now hospitals are running out of oxygen and bodies are stacking up in morgues
by Hannah Ellis-Petersen in Delhi

Wed 21 Apr 2021 12.15 BST


4691

Looking out over a sea of jostling, maskless faces gathered at a political rally in West Bengal on Saturday, the Indian prime minister, Narendra Modi, proudly proclaimed that he had “never ever seen such huge crowds”. A mask was also noticeably absent from Modi’s face.
That same day, India registered a record-breaking 234,000 new coronavirus cases and 1,341 deaths – and the numbers have kept rising since.

The country has descended into a tragedy of unprecedented proportions. Almost 1.6 million cases have been registered in a week, bringing total cases to more than 15 million. In the space of just 12 days, the Covid positivity rate doubled to 17%, while in Delhi it hit 30%. Hospitals across the country have filled to capacity but this time it is predominately the young taking up the beds; in Delhi, 65% of cases are under 40 years old.
While the unprecedented spread of the virus has been partly blamed on a more contagious variant that has emerged in India, Modi’s government has also been accused of failures of political leadership from the top, with lax attitudes emulated by state and local leaders from all parties and even health officials across the country, which led many to falsely believe in recent months that India had defeated Covid.
A patient wearing an oxygen mask is wheeled inside a Covid-19 hospital for treatment in Ahmedabad.

A patient wearing an oxygen mask is wheeled inside a Covid-19 hospital for treatment in Ahmedabad. Photograph: Amit Dave/Reuters
“Leadership across the country did not adequately convey that this was an epidemic which had not gone away,” said K Srinath Reddy, president of the Public Health Foundation of India.
Advertisement

“Victory was declared prematurely and that ebullient mood was communicated across the country, especially by politicians who wanted to get the economy going and wanted to get back to campaigning. And that gave the virus the chance to rise again.”
In West Bengal, where Modi’s government has refused to curtail the drawn-out state elections that his Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) is hoping to win, Modi and his home minister, Amit Shah, continued their public meetings and roadshows into this week even as queues of ambulances lined up outside hospitals across India. On Saturday, the same day as Modi’s rally, the state registered 7,713 new cases – the highest since the pandemic began. Three candidates running in the election have died from the virus. By Sunday, #ModiMadeDisaster began trending on Twitter.

Doctors on the frontline broke down, speaking of the deluge of dying Covid patients they had been unable to treat due to a lack of beds and inadequate state and central government preparation.
Advertisement

Dr Amit Thadhani, director of Niramaya hospital in Mumbai, which is only treating Covid patients, said he had given warnings about a virulent second wave back in February but they had gone ignored. He said now his hospital was “completely full and if a patient gets discharged, the bed is filled within minutes”. Ten days ago, the hospital ran out of oxygen, but alternative supplies were found just in time.
“There are people lined up outside the hospital trying to get in and every day we are getting calls every 30 seconds from someone trying to find a bed,” said Thadhani. “Most of these calls are for patients who are critically ill and do need hospital care but there just isn’t enough capacity and so there is a lot of mortality happening. Everyone has been stretched to their limit.”
Thadhani said this time round the virus was “much more aggressive and much more infectious” and was now predominately affecting young people. “Now it is people in their 20s and 30s who are coming in with very severe symptoms and there is a lot of mortality among young people,” he said.
Health workers and relatives carry the body of a man who died from coronavirus disease, at a crematorium in New Delhi.

Health workers and relatives carry the body of a man who died from coronavirus, at a crematorium in New Delhi. Photograph: Adnan Abidi/Reuters
Advertisement

The haunting blare of ambulance sirens continued to ring out across the capital almost non-stop. Inside Lok Nayak government hospital in Delhi, the largest Covid facility in the capital, overburdened facilities and a shortage of oxygen cylinders meant there was two to a bed, while outside patients waiting for beds gasped for air on stretchers and in ambulances, while sobbing relatives stood by their sides. Some sat with oxygen cylinders they had bought themselves out of desperation. Others died waiting in the hospital car park.

Advertisement

In Mumbai, which was the first city to bear the brunt of the second wave, Dr Jalil Parkar of Lilavati hospital said that “the whole healthcare system has collapsed and doctors are exhausted”.
“There is a shortage of beds, shortage of oxygen, shortage of drugs, shortage of vaccines, shorting of testing,” said Parkar.
“Even though we opened another wing for Covid, we still don’t have nearly enough beds, so we have had to put some patients in the corridors and we have turned the basement into a triage area for Covid patients. We have people waiting in ambulances and wheelchairs outside the hospital and we have to sometimes give them oxygen out there. What else can we do?”

Even those in the upper echelons of power struggled to find beds for their loved ones. Vijay Singh Kumar, the national minister for transport and a BJP MP in the state of Uttar Pradesh, resorted to Twitter with the plea: “Please help us, my brother needs a bed for corona treatment. Now beds are not being arranged in Ghaziabad.”
Announcing a six-day lockdown to prevent the complete collapse of the healthcare system, Delhi’s chief minister, Arvind Kejriwal, did not mince his words. “The Covid situation in Delhi is grim,” he said on Monday. Over 99% of ICU beds in the capital were occupied that day and by Tuesday, several of Delhi’s top hospitals, all with hundreds of Covid patients, had declared oxygen emergencies, warning they had just hours of supplies left.

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States such a Gujarat and Uttar Pradesh stand accused of covering up the true death toll from coronavirus, with the numbers of bodies stacking up in hospital morgues far outnumbering official fatality figures. Among the worst-hit cities in Uttar Pradesh was Lucknow, where 22-year-old Deepti Mistri – a mother of one who had no pre-existing health conditions – was among the city’s dead, after falling ill with Covid on 14 April.
Her uncle Saroj Kumar Pandey, an ambulance driver who raised her from childhood, said he had desperately tried to find her a hospital bed when, two days later, her oxygen level began to drop dangerously to below 50% but could not find anywhere that had room.
A notice about the shortage of coronavirus vaccine supplies is seen at a vaccination centre, in Mumbai.

A notice about the shortage of coronavirus vaccine supplies is seen at a vaccination centre, in Mumbai. Photograph: Francis Mascarenhas/Reuters
“I realised Deepti needed oxygen immediately so I arranged for a cylinder for her myself,” he said. “I put her into the back of a relative’s car with the oxygen while I went around to a dozen private and government hospitals trying to find her a bed and a ventilator. But nowhere would take her.”
Eventually, late at night on 16 April Pandey found her a bed in a small six-bed private clinic in Lucknow. It was not a Covid hospital but they agreed to take her for a single night to give her oxygen while Pandey continued his search for a hospital bed. “We kept looking all night but nowhere had a bed or ventilator for her,” he said. “In the morning the clinic discharged her at 5am, so we had no choice but to bring her home. Deepti died a few hours later because she did not have oxygen and hospital care. She should be alive today.”
People carry a medical oxygen cylinder at a refilling station in Allahabad.

People carry a medical oxygen cylinder at a refilling station in Allahabad. Photograph: Sanjay Kanojia/AFP/Getty Images
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Twitter and Facebook have become a devastating catalogue of hundreds of thousands of urgent pleas for help finding hospital beds, oxygen, plasma and remdesivir, the drug experimentally used to help treat Covid patients, which remains in short supply in hospitals across the country.
The dead, meanwhile, have continued to overload crematoriums and graveyards in the states of Uttar Pradesh, Gujarat and Delhi faster than they could be burned, and families waited days to cremate their loved ones. On Sunday, Delhi’s largest cremation facility, Nigambodh Ghat, ran out of space, despite doubling its funeral pyres to more than 60.
State governments in Delhi and Mumbai have been scrambling to rebuild the temporary Covid facilities they had dismantled months earlier, while the central government announced an amping up of the vaccination programme which would mean anyone over the age of 18 will be eligible from 1 May, though a shortage of supplies remains an issue.
An edict from the government ruled that all oxygen meant for industrial use would now be diverted to hospitals to meet the unprecedented demand, and Indian railways said they were all set to operate special trains specially designed to carry liquid oxygen and oxygen cylinders, dubbed the “Oxygen Express”. Thousands of Covid beds have also been arranged in train carriages.
Still, many fear that it is too little, too late. “The seriousness of the situation should have been realised months ago but instead governments were in denial and gave out messages that the virus was not that dangerous any more,” said Thadhani. “I’m worried that we still have not seen the worst.”
Mohammad Sartaj Alam contributed reporting
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是不是方舟子没有算到病毒变异成了双头怪兽?:evil:
 

贵圈

Attacks on me, frankly, are attacks on science :)
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非常有可能抗药了。
 

向问天

日月神教光明左使
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双变病毒刚出来没多久,三变病毒又出来了


印度流行病学教授马杜卡尔·派表示,在印度发现的新型新冠病毒毒株是一种三重突变的毒株,可能传播更快。

基因组生物学研究所的工作人员维诺德·斯卡利亚表示,科学家们在印度东部的西孟加拉邦发现了一种名为B.1.618的新变异病毒,其特征是除了刺突蛋白中的E484K和D614G突变,还有6个核苷酸(H146del和Y145del)的染色体重排。

派告诉新德里电视台:“这一变异病毒传播更快,它让人染病的速度非常快。”

刺突蛋白中的E484K突变在“南非”毒株、“巴西” 毒株和“孟加拉国”毒株中很常见。根据一些专家的观点,这种突变可以降低单克隆抗体在中和病毒方面的效力。

D614突变导致第614位氨基酸由天冬氨酸变成了甘氨酸。科学家们发现,具有此突变的新冠病毒比其它病毒传播得更快,并且在它入侵的任何区域都占支配地位。不过,没有证据表明感染这种突变会导致更加严重的病症。

新的毒株B.1.618是从印度发现的第二种新冠病毒毒株。

第一种是B.1.617,也称为双突变变异新冠病毒。印度医学研究理事会周三表示,在印度研发的考瓦辛(Covishield)疫苗成功中和了这种新冠病毒变种。
 
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